?

Log in

Shiso/Japanese basil - Adventures in Japanese Cooking
December 2011
 
 
 
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
poor_xanthippe:
beyond_sushi
beyond_sushi
Japanese Recipes - More than just sushi!
Sat, Sep. 25th, 2010 11:11 pm
Shiso/Japanese basil

An acquintance of mine brought a load of Japanese basil/shiso seeds with her from Japan this summer. She grew the lot of them in her back garden, but now has had to dig them up because they won't survive our winters. I ended up with two of them (one green, one purple) and will be trying to grow them as potted plants in my apartment (you never know, right?). We'll be trying the same with a couple of them in my parents' greenhouse.
Anyway, so now I have two plants which may or may not last through the winter, so at the very least I will have to do something with them before then. I know you can use it as seasoning or even fry whole leaves as tempura, but I was wondering if you guys have any tips on particularly tasty uses of/recipes for this herb,

EDIT: I just got a tip from my Japanese teacher and thought I'd share: take a chicken filet and slice it thinly. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and white wine and leave for a few minutes. Wrap each slice in a shiso leave (greener side on the outside). Fry them in a frying pan just long enough to make sure the chicken is done (we don't want salmonella poisoning).

Current Mood: cheerful cheerful

8CommentReplyShare

serenia
serenia
Serenia
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 01:07 am (UTC)

I've always been curious about this plant, though not quite game to try growing them myself. What does it taste like? I've heard of it called the 'beefsteak plant', but I can't imagine it tastes like beef!


ReplyThread
poor_xanthippe
poor_xanthippe
poor_xanthippe
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 09:03 am (UTC)

It doesn't taste like beef at all, in my opinion. I can't imagine where it got that name. It tastes a bit like a cross between basil and mint, though not quite as strong. It's very fresh.


ReplyThread Parent
serenia
serenia
Serenia
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 10:39 am (UTC)

Maybe it goes good with beef! Sounds like it'd be nice with lamb.


ReplyThread Parent
violentecstasy
violentecstasy
ZS Virago
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 02:07 am (UTC)

I use shiso in onigiri and sushi, but mostly I use it in non-Japanese foods for whatever reason. It's great in fresh spring rolls and salads (tabbouleh in particular).


ReplyThread
pope_jackson
pope_jackson
pope_jackson
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 02:13 am (UTC)

I've never used shiso before, but I heard it's like basil's Asian cousin. So why not substitute shiso where you would use basil, as an experiment? Like shiso pesto (you can sub pinenuts for almonds, or basically any nut you think would complement the shiso). It's worth a shot if you end up with a bumper crop of shiso on your windowsill! : )


ReplyThread
seabookmonger
seabookmonger
seabookmonger
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 02:57 am (UTC)

I love it wrapped around a little hot rice, with a piece of raw fish stuck in the middle, or a little bit of Japanese pickle or nothing. Sort of lazy person's almost sushi. I think it clashes with tomato sauce but in a salad it'd be pretty nice. Tabouleh with shiso sounds really outstanding.
Indoors will be tough on your plant, as it'll be liable to get mites or a plant disease I think.


ReplyThread
poor_xanthippe
poor_xanthippe
poor_xanthippe
Sun, Sep. 26th, 2010 09:13 am (UTC)

I love the lazy person's sushi idea, I'm definitely going to try that. Thanks!
So far, all my indoor plants have been disease free. I haven't seen anything amiss with the shiso plants yet either. They were outdoors until a few days ago and plant mites don't do well in this climate (they're considered to be a problem only in greenhouses), so I don't think they've picked them up. Fingers crossed, though!


ReplyThread Parent
rebecca_brooks
rebecca_brooks
rebecca_brooks
Mon, Sep. 27th, 2010 04:23 pm (UTC)
Kitazawa says...

http://www.kitazawaseed.com/seeds_perilla.html ....says "Perilla is either red or green, the red perilla having an anise flavor and slightly less spicy than the green variety, which tastes more like cinnamon. The leaves, which are rich in calcium and iron, are used for seasoning, coloring, pickling and garnishing. Shiso leaves can be used whole or cut into strips. Use the flower buds by collecting the seeds at the end of the season to sprinkle on salad and rice. The Japanese, in particular, use the red variety to color umeboshi and pickled ginger. Perilla seeds form an essential part of the famous seven spices of Japan, which originated more than 300 years ago in Kyoto. Green perilla leaves are often wrapped around sushi or served with "sashimi" as a garnish. They also are added to soups, tempura or dried and sprinkled over rice. Japanese chefs add red perilla to tofu or bean curd dishes or use it wrapped around pieces of meat."

Sounds sooo gooood "n_n"


ReplyThread